Thomas hood the bridge of sighs. ENGLISH 2000: Fallen Women: Hood's Bridge of 2018-12-29

Thomas hood the bridge of sighs Rating: 7,9/10 1650 reviews

The Bridge of Sighs, by Thomas Hood

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

The Bridge of Sighs is delicate, full of pathos, and represents the plight of any young woman in the Victorian era who has been unfortunate enough to lose her virtue. As the author states in lines 15-20, he wants her to be thought of as a pure, respectful woman and not what she did for her work. Sisterly, brotherly, Fatherly, motherly Feelings had changed: Love, by harsh evidence, Thrown from its eminence; Even God's providence Seeming estranged. The most famous ones were that of the Victorian era. Look at her garments Clinging like cerements; Whilst the wave constantly Drips from her clothing; Take her up instantly, Loving, not loathing.


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The Bridge of Sighs by Thomas Hood. Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. 1895. A Victorian Anthology, 1837

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

Or was there a dearer one Still, and a nearer one Yet, than all other? Loop up her tresses Escaped from the comb, Her fair auburn tresses; Whilst wonderment guesses Where was her home? I think that the cleaning up of her is also associated with the idea that maybe by committing suicide, she has been cleansed of her sins, so she no longer has to look the part of someone distressed. I agree with Tricia as far as the forgiveness that seems to come in lines 21-26, I definitely see it as only coming once the woman has died. First Line: One more Unfortunate, Last Line: Her sins to her Saviour! The bleak wind of March Made her tremble and shiver, But not the dark arch, Or the black flowing river; Mad from life’s history, Glad to death’s mystery, Swift to be hurl’d— Any where, any where Out of the world! Although the city in the background is partially masked by fog, a single bright star can be seen in the sky. Watts In Found Drowned, Watts shows the deceased woman under Waterloo Bridge, her legs still dangling in the Thames. In times like these, the society should learn how to help these kinds of people instead of pushing them even more to do something that would lead to their suicidal attempts. Lave in it, drink of it, Then, if you can! In my opinion, I do not believe one has to die to become cleansed.

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The Bridge of Sighs poem

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

He died on May 3,. To answer prompt three, I would say that it's pretty circumstancial whether or not a prostitute would have to die to be completely cleansed. Fallen women were often depicted with sympathy by Pre-Raphaelite artists and this work definitely has a social theme. Take her up tenderly, Lift her with care; Fashion'd so slenderly, Young, and so fair! Alive she was wild and evil in the eyes of the poet, but now after death her sins are only between her and God and invisible to the man who can now see her beauty. It is composed of 18 stanzas, each consisting of three to seven lines.

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The Bridge of Sighs by Thomas Hood

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

Had she lived to give birth to her child, she faced destitution and life as a social pariah. For all its high sentence, it was popular entertainment, and it gave rise to many similar melodramas and paintings. Time passed and a number of illustrations were made to reveal the interpretation of the book. In she plunged boldly— No matter how coldly The rough river ran— Over the brink of it, Picture it—think of it, Dissolute Man! Clearly, she can't actaully do that. As mentioned earlier, Hood wrote the poem two weeks after the death of Mary Furley who was convicted of murder for killing her own child. One more Unfortunate Weary of breath, Rashly importunate, Gone to her death! Loop up her tresses Escaped from the comb, Her fair auburn tresses; Whilst wonderment guesses Where was her home? Still, for all slips of hers, One of Eve’s family— Wipe those poor lips of hers Oozing so clammily.

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Bridge of by Thomas Hood (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

I think that the poem was written very sympathetically throughout. Take her up tenderly, Lift her with care; Fashion'd so slenderly, Young, and so fair! I think that the speaker uses so much detail in describing the physical presence of the dead woman to show the seriousness of the suicides of these women. In she plunged boldly— No matter how coldly The rough river ran— Over the brink of it, Picture it—think of it, Dissolute Man! She was a 40-year old woman with children, but no husband. Sisterly, brotherly, Fatherly, motherly Feelings had changed: Love, by harsh evidence, Thrown from its eminence; Even God's providence Seeming estranged. Sisterly, brotherly, Fatherly, motherly Feelings had changed: Love, by harsh evidence, Thrown from its eminence; Even God's providence Seeming estranged. Look at her garments Clinging like cerements; Whilst the wave constantly Drips from her clothing; Take her up instantly, Loving, not loathing. Still, for all slips of hers, One of Eve's family-- Wipe those poor lips of hers Oozing so clammily.

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The Bridge Of Sighs, Poem Analysis

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

The man gets no punishment for being with the prostitute, but the girl feels as if the only way she can free herself and be forgiven is by killing herself and I think the author is trying to show that maybe that is not fair. It was also set to music by 1849—1919. Allegedly, this woman is homeless and so she jumped of the Waterloo Bridge to meet her death. The Bridge of Sighs is actually a depressing poem. The only way to completely escape that kind of past is death Garrett Simoneaux 1. Reputation was everything then even more so than now and not very many women could come back from that.

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The Bridge Of Sighs Poem by Thomas Hood

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

Take her up tenderly, Lift her with care; Fashion'd so slenderly Young, and so fair! But Hood was a great humanitarian and he meant well. Weighed down figuratively, if not literally by shame and despair, but unable to escape her situation, the prostitute throws herself into the water in a last act of desperation and escape. The tone of the poem is sympathetic. Stephanie Graham Piña is an independent scholar whose research focuses on Victorian Art, especially the Pre-Raphaelites. It's about Waterloo bridge over the Thames in London not The Bridge of Sighs in Venice and the suicide of young woman outcast from her family and driven to prostitution. Thus, the River Thames, which runs through London a hotbed of prostitution , was often portrayed as a place where prostitutes went to die. If you will think about it, the suicide could have been prevented if people only gave so much more attention and if they become more understanding.


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Bridge of by Thomas Hood (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

thomas hood the bridge of sighs

Or was there a dearer one Still, and a nearer one Yet, than all other? A prostitute does not need to die to feel cleansed in the eyes of God but needs to die to be cleansed to the people of the Victorian Era. Near a whole city full, Home she had none. Lave in I, drink of it, Then, if you can! The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900. Touch her not scornfully; Think of her mournfully, Gently and humanly; Not of the stains of her, All that remains of her Now is pure womanly. Hood was the father of playwright and humourist Tom Hood 1835—1874. Her money has been stolen, so she attempted to kill herself and her children through drowning. The speaker describes the dead woman's physical presence in such detail because showing somewhat of respect for her.

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