Shakespeare my mistress. Poetic Devices Used in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 2019-01-11

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

shakespeare my mistress

Think about someone you love, whether a girlfriend or a boyfriend or a really good friend. Straying away from the dazzling rhetoric, this Shakespearean poem projects a humane and friendly impression and elicits laughter while expressing a truer love. In this line the speaker starts out talking about his lover's eyes, and we expect him to give her a compliment, because that's what we've heard in a million different poems and songs. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. The poetic speaker, rather than elevate her, brings her further down to earth. The words completing the first two lines in each quatrain, when paired together, describe something pleasant while the words paired in the second two lines describe something unpleasant. Clutching on to the side of the cliff one hand, grasping a branch with another.

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Shakespeare's My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun...

shakespeare my mistress

Does the end justify the earlier lines? Basically it just means a pattern of mixed colors woven into expensive fabric. And yet, I think she is as rare a woman as any woman who has been falsely compared to these paragons of beauty. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know I love to hear her speak, but I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; That music has a more pleasing sound. Source Or maybe others think she was a married woman named Emilia Lanier who came from a Jewish background. Quote 2 My mistress when she walks treads on the ground line 12 This is a really nice image of the simple beauty that the speaker loves.

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Sonnet 130

shakespeare my mistress

In the first quatrain, the speaker spends one line on each comparison between his mistress and something else the sun, coral, snow, and wires—the one positive thing in the whole poem some part of his mistress is like. Our speaker has seen beautiful roses like that, but his mistress's cheeks don't remind him of them at all. New York: Washington Square, 2004. The images conjured by Shakespeare were common ones that would have been well-recognized by a reader or listener of this sonnet. Check out how he does this in the last two lines of this poem. The speaker lets us know that his lover doesn't come close to that spooky ideal. The first two quatrains compare the speaker's mistress to aspects of nature, such as snow or coral; each comparison ending unflatteringly for the mistress.

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A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130: ‘My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun’

shakespeare my mistress

Or perhaps she is deserving but such words are not necessary, as though the narrator feels comfortable enough with the dark lady that he is able to show such honesty which his insecurity regarding the fair lord prevents him from doing? What did it have to do with me? But, if you think sappy love poems are ridiculous, you're not alone — that's pretty much how felt too, and he spends these fourteen lines ripping that kind of poem apart. Every line refers to her, whether it's describing her appearance or her smell or the way she walks. He runs down the charges against his mistress as if he were an attorney, and then, at the last moment, he makes a sudden appeal for her. He loves her for what the reality is, and not because he can compare her to beautiful things. And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. Our speaker has seen beautiful roses like that, but his mistress's cheeks don't remind him of them at all. Sonnet 130 Love Quotes Quote 1 I love to hear her speak line 9 It takes him more than half of the poem to get there, but the speaker finally says that he loves something about his mistress.


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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

shakespeare my mistress

The contrast between mockery and love is what drives the poem. Contemporary poets, such as Sidney and Watson, would use the Petrarchan sonnet for its poetic form, whereas in Sonnet 130, Shakespeare mocks all the conventions of it. Shakespeare doesn't say anything about this woman's race, but with her black hair and dark skin, we can definitely tell that she doesn't look like a Barbie doll. I have loved this sonnet for many years at least in part because of Sting! Unfortunately, it just makes her sound uglier. Think about a gorgeous movie star, for example. The Way She Moves… Symbol Analysis Of course this perfect woman that the speaker is taking apart would have to be as graceful as an angel too. It was customary to praise the beauty of the object of one's affections with comparisons to beautiful things found in nature and heaven, such as stars in the night sky, the golden light of the rising sun, or red roses.


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Shakespeare Sonnet 130 Analysis: My mistress' eyes are nothing like (...)

shakespeare my mistress

Usually, if you were talking about your beloved, you would go out of your way to praise her, to point all the ways that she is the best. I led them on in this confused terror and left the lovely Pyramus there, transformed. Shakespeare talks about her hair, the color of her skin, etc. He goes so far as to condemn the smell of her, and the sound of her voice. In telling his mistress that he loves her, our speaker also has to give us an idea about what his love is like.

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My Mistress With A Monster Is In Love: Monologue Analysis

shakespeare my mistress

Shakespeare uses this sonnet not only to satirize bad poetry, but also to criticize the unrealistic expectations that men have for female beauty. We call this a couplet. On the other hand, his sarcastic tone keeps us from taking ourselves too seriously, and he has a way of turning things on their head and making us see them in a new way. Shakespeare proves that love can be written about and accomplished without the artificial and exuberant. Compared to the whiteness of snow, her breasts are grayish-brown.

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Sonnet 130

shakespeare my mistress

Shakespeare seems to be having fun here, pushing his gross-out portrait as far as it will go. As he gently mocks traditional love poems, the speaker manages to maintain a light tone. This shows that the poet appreciates her human beauties unlike a Petrarchan sonnet that stresses a woman's cheek as red a rose or her face white as snow. Nearly all of Shakespeare's sonnets examine the inevitable decay of time, and the immortalization of beauty and love in poetry. But despite all these things, he still loves? In this case, though, spends this poem comparing his mistress's appearance to other things, and then telling us how she doesn't measure up to them. Well, that's just the kind of frequently used phrase that our speaker doesn't have much time for. Perfumes smell sweeter than the breath that comes out of her mouth.

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